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  • Mark Wallace
    Cell Tower - Neighborhood Health Risks16
    Topic last edited January 19, 2012 by Mark WallaceElite Contributor, tagged commonground discussions 
    Title:
    Cell Tower - Neighborhood Health Risks
    Content:

    It appears as if the golf course bordering my house is looking to make some additional revenue.  They are trying to put up a 150 ft. cell phone tower.  The neighbors are not happy because the feel the structure will be an eye sore.  A balloon test is scheduled for this weekend.  For me, I have concerns about the potential health risks for my family, not so much the visual as it probably won't impact my view from my home.  

    Let's face it - it cannot be good to have a cell tower anywhere near your house - right? I guess I don't believe for one second, the story that if it is constructed correctly, there are no issues.  

    Thanks in advance for your opinions.

  • EdG
    How Much Lead Exposure is Too Much13
    Topic last edited January 19, 2012 by EdGElite Contributor 
    Title:
    How Much Lead Exposure is Too Much
    Content:

    Anyone know how much exposure to lead can cause serious harm to a child?

    I understand all about lead and exposure as it relates to regulations, prevention, testing, dangerous levels, adverse effects and curing lead poisoning.  As well as age of the child (1-6) being more suseptible than 'older children.' And I realize it is highly subjective - e.g. if a child was in a room that was being lead remediated and dust was all over the place - that is a serious problem.

    My question is more about lead paint on the doorways and baseboards that have some 'chips' but the chips aren't ingested and there isn't any noteworthy 'dust.'

    Under that scenario - (again recognizing any lead is not safe or good) - is this a serious concern.

    Any insight would be most appreciated as this one cuts close to home for me.  Thanks

    Btw - same question applies to how much asbestos exposure is 'too much?'  One fiber - 12?

    Ed

  • Mark Wallace
    Radon Opinions Please10
    Topic last edited January 19, 2012 by Mark WallaceElite Contributor, tagged ASTM, environmental due diligence, Environmental standards, Vapor Intrusion 
    Title:
    Radon Opinions Please
    Content:

    As many of you know, the EPA recommends that action be taken to reduce radon levels on properties that are tested and have a result higher than 4pC/IL. 

    If you did a radon test and results came back at a level of 7.2, do you strongly believe that the installation of a radon mitigation system will solve the problem?  Do you feel that it is a safe, long term solution? 

    Thanks in advance for answers.

  • dcrocker
    anyone following Chinese drywall?254.5
    Topic last edited January 19, 2012 by dcrockerElite Contributor 
    Title:
    anyone following Chinese drywall?
    Content:

    I keep seeing stories on the risk of Chinese drywall. Latest is a good Wall Street Journal article today:

    http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052970203674704574332264031026476.html?mod=googlenews_wsj

    "An estimated 100,000 houses across the country, most built in 2006 and 2007, may be affected, based on the 500 million pounds of Chinese drywall—also known as plasterboard or gypsum board—believed to have entered the U.S. during that period.

    "More than 800 complaints from 23 states have been filed at the Consumer Product Safety Commission’s Drywall Information Center."

    Anyone following this new issue? how do you know if your contractor used it?

  • dcrocker
    New federal guidelines on Chinese drywall
    Topic posted April 2, 2010 by dcrockerElite Contributor 
    Title:
    New federal guidelines on Chinese drywall
    Content:

    I know a number of you are following the topic of Chinese drywall. Today HUD and the CPSC issued interim remediation guidance to help homeowners dealing with drywall problems. Their strict recommendation calls for the removal of all possible problem drywall, and the replacement of electrical components and wiring, gas service piping, fire suppression sprinkler systems, smoke alarms and carbon monoxide alarms.  

  • EdG
    Residential Homes: Another Source of Environmental...1
    Topic last edited January 19, 2012 by EdGElite Contributor 
    Title:
    Residential Homes: Another Source of Environmental Contamination
    Content:

    Residential homes - are not immune from environmental risk.  You have mold, radon, lead, and even underground storage tanks. 

    The residential home of Tim and Stacy Creamer in Danvers, MA was unfit for habitability and had to move out 14 hours from moving in. The reason: an undisclosed buried and leaking heating oil tank in their basement.

    Do you consider environmental risk at your home and/or surrounding neighborhood?

  • AmyH
    Lead paint help10
    Topic last edited January 19, 2012 by AmyHSuper Contributor 
    Title:
    Lead paint help
    Content:

    Desperately seeking information: I have both an old house and a new baby. The house is covered with several layers of flaking paint, most definitely lead based. We are getting it stripped to the cedar shakes and repainted. My question:� What precautions should I take? Draping the ground, closing windows, etc.? What else? The house is too big to tent. Should I move out for a week? Is it okay to sandblast? I need to have the house painted but I don't want to expose the baby.

  • AmyH
    Lead paint help4
    Topic last edited January 19, 2012 by AmyHSuper Contributor 
    Title:
    Lead paint help
    Content:

    Desperately seeking information: I have both an old house and a new baby. The house is covered with several layers of flaking paint, most definitely lead based. We are getting it stripped to the cedar shakes and repainted. My question:� What precautions should I take? Draping the ground, closing windows, etc.? What else? The house is too big to tent. Should I move out for a week? Is it okay to sandblast? I need to have the house painted but I don't want to expose the baby.

  • AmyH
    Lead Paint: Seeking Additional Info2
    Topic last edited January 19, 2012 by AmyHSuper Contributor 
    Title:
    Lead Paint: Seeking Additional Info
    Content:

    OK so I found out that it's going to take two weeks to sand the paint off my old, lead-covered house. It's not practical for me to leave with my 10-month-old, because I work out of a home office.

    Would it be okay to stay here if the storms are closed and the painting contractor swears they are experienced in draping and cleanup? Or am I playing with fire (er, lead)? Should I have my child's lead levels tested? I'm no alarmist, but I don't want to be casual about it either. I guess I'm not quite sure how bad the risks are and am looking for expertise. How likely is is that lead dust will get in the house? And once the sanding's done, am I in the clear?

  • EdG
    Residential Mold: Toxic Tort
    Topic posted May 2, 2009 by EdGElite Contributor 
    Title:
    Residential Mold: Toxic Tort
    Content:

    Mold - we all know about the harm it can cause, the various types, how it spreads, grows, etc., etc. 

    But I now have a mold case with real live people that are extremely sick and I would greatly appreciate any insight from people who have dealt "hands-on" with such cases.  From "best remediation practices"of a residential home infestation (and reputable restoration contractors - I know a few that aren't); to specialists - whether they be environmental doctors, allergists or whomever can help.

    We all have dealt with the 'academics' of this topic - I now have to provide professional legal assistance to a family that is sick due to mold.  Any insight and direction (not that I am clueless - as I have dealt with this topic extensively - but on the 'academic level') into the real life issues - that would be very much appreciated!

    Many thanks,

    Ed Greene

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