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Posts

  • LSchnapf
    Dry Cleaners: The Environmental Scourge of Commercial Real...
    Entry posted October 28, 2014 by LSchnapfElite Contributor in Blogs > Larry Schnapf - Schnapf Judgment public
    Title:
    Dry Cleaners: The Environmental Scourge of Commercial Real Estate
    Entry:

    My latest article in the Practical Real Estate Lawyer covers the risks posed by dry cleaners and includes numerous pictures depicting these risks. The article is available from my website at: http://www.environmental-law.net/resources/published-publications/

    Keywords:
    dry cleaners, vapor intrusion, due diligence, phase 1, toxic torts
  • CRG Texas, LLC Kevin C. Casler
    Environmental Specialist
    Job Opportunity posted October 27, 2014 by CRG Texas, LLC Kevin C. CaslerMember in Environmental Jobs Board public
    Job Title:
    Environmental Specialist
    Company Name:
    CRG Texas Environmental Services, Inc.
    Company Address:
    2504 Avenue I
    Rosenberg, Texas 77471
    Google map
    Employment Status:
    Full-time
    Start Date:
    ASAP
    Project Duration:
    undetermined
    Employer Contact:
    Administration
    Contact Phone:
    713-474-1570
    Contact Email:
    Job Description:

    Environmental Specialist- (Fort Bend County)


    Organization: CRG Texas Environmental Services, Inc.    Job Title: Environmental Specialist and Environmental Project Manager Positions        Job Location: Rosenberg Texas Area     Job Status: Full-Time     Salary: Based upon experience 

    Experience Level: 5-10 years      Organization Type: Private Sector < 25 Employees         Application Deadline: Until filled

     
    Job Description: Environmental Specialist - CRG Texas has 2 immediate openings in the Fort Bend County, Texas area:

     

    Environmental Specialist         Minimum 5 years experience

    The Environmental Specialist will be expected to conduct environmental assessments, investigations, and regulatory agency reporting. Candidates should be experienced in regulatory framework for the Texas Commission on Environmental Quality (TCEQ) Leaking Petroleum Storage Tank (LPST) program, Texas Risk Reduction Program (TRRP), and Voluntary Cleanup Programs (VCP), and the Rail Road Commission of Texas (RRCTX) Rules 8, 20, and 91. Other duties are anticipated to include: conduct soil and groundwater assessments including soil borings, well installations, groundwater monitoring, aquifer testing, environmental compliance/storm water inspections, monitoring, and maintaining associated documentation according to project and TCEQ Construction General Permit guidelines, and conduction of environmental training for project employees. Additional tasks may include field work, report preparation and administrative duties. Some overnight travel on short notice may be required.

     

    Environmental Professional                 Minimum 10 years experience

    The Environmental Professional will be expected to conduct and manage environmental assessments, investigations, and regulatory agency reporting as listed for each of the regulatory programs listed above, have management experience, and be a "doer-seller". Additional tasks may include field work, report preparation and administrative duties. Some overnight travel on short notice may be required.

     

    Education & Experience Requirements

    Bachelor's degree in Ecology, Geology (PG a Plus) or Environmental Science or a related science, and a minimum of 5-10 years of experience in environmental science industry required. Project management, work plan and cost proposal preparation, client service management, and exposure to the consulting environment is preferred. Previous construction and remediation project experience is also preferred. 

     

    Practical Experience

    Qualifications include an understanding of TCEQ and Railroad Commission of Texas, LPST and TRRP requirements; strong organizational and communication skills; and proficiency with MS Office, and AutoCad a plus. Must be able to conduct fieldwork for long hours, in sometimes severe weather conditions, including walking at least 10 miles in rugged terrain, and be able to carry equipment and supplies weighing greater than 40 pounds. Some travel periodically up to 2 weeks at a time is required when needed. Individual will also be required to make themselves available after normal working hours and weekends when needed. Must be a self starter and lead and manage other team members and subcontractors.

     

    Benefits

    We offer competitive salaries, most major holidays, vacation, sick leave, and medical, dental, and vision insurance benefits. CRG Texas is an equal opportunity employer.


    How to apply: If you wish to be considered for this opportunity, please send a cover letter and a copy of a current resume detailing work experience and education via email to: 


    Fax: 713-481-1861                     E-mail:              info@crgtexas.com                   Website:           www.crgtexas.com


    Information may also be sent by mail or fax. If e-mailing credentials, please provide them in Microsoft Word or Adobe Acrobat (PDF) format.

  • MargaretThibo
    Coal Ash is the Culprit Again
    Entry posted October 25, 2014 by MargaretThiboContributor in Current Environmental Issues > Current Environmental Issues Blog public
    Title:
    Coal Ash is the Culprit Again
    Entry:

    Environmental groups have been cracking down on the handling of coal ash storage ponds since a 50,000 ton spill occurs into North Carolina’s Dan River in February 2014 as well as a large breach in late 2008 in Tennessee. These groups have made water contamination due to coal ash an extremely current environmental issue.

    As a result of the focus, The Southern Environmental Law Center, Potomac River keeper, and Sierra Nevada Club have banded together to take on Dominion Virginia Power and their Possum Point Power Plant. Upon site assessment, five coal ash ponds were revealed, two of which remain active. The remaining ponds have been abandoned for the past 50 years and were only revealed after all of the attention the Dan River spill received. These ponds are completely unlined, allowing arsenic, mercury, lead, and cadmium to leach into ground water and ultimately the Potomac River. Testing has revealed water contamination from heavy metals at 127 times the Virginia standard.

    The two active ponds are also contaminating groundwater with heavy metals, a fact that Dominion Virginia Power has been aware of at least the past ten years, if not longer. Office memos as well as official reports support this belief. Inspectors also left comments regarding the toxic waste disposal upon each visit. There is no evidence that efforts were ever made to change procedures and prevent contamination. The three environmental groups are threatening Dominion with a lawsuit if nothing is done to help resolve the contamination. If a case was filed, it would accuse the Power Company of violating the Clean Water Act.

    The environmental groups pushing for action believe that the issue must be addressed to set an important precedence in the state of Virginia that unprotected coal ash ponds will not be tolerated. Ideally, Dominion Virginia Power would move all of the coal ash ponds to dry, lined storage facilities that are not located near waterways. The Power Company has several other sites across Virginia, all of which are expected to have equally concerning contamination issues. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is also working on new environmental regulations regarding how coal can be disposed of and stored. These regulations are set to be implemented in mid-December 2014 and would help give environmentalist another legal leg to stand on and get large companies to clean up their toxic mess.

    Keywords:
    water contamination, current environmental issue, site assessment, environmental regulations
  • MargaretThibo
    Louisiana Board Floods Oil Industry with Lawsuits
    Entry posted October 25, 2014 by MargaretThiboContributor in Current Environmental Issues > Current Environmental Issues Blog public
    Title:
    Louisiana Board Floods Oil Industry with Lawsuits
    Entry:

    The Southeast Louisiana Flood Protection Authority-East’s board of commissioners has launched one of the largest and most controversial environmental lawsuits in recent years. The Board headed by flood expert John Barry, is an attempt to hold the gas and oil industry responsible for their role in destroying Louisiana’s’ coastal wetlands.

    Over the past 85 years or so, Louisiana’s coastal wetlands have all but disappeared. The Mississippi River has been dammed at several points which prevent flooding that carries vital sediment to the mouth of the river.  Sediment has also been dredged to make way for major shipping routes. These routes allow saltwater to flow into the wetlands which becomes a major source of water contamination. Salt water kills much of the vegetation in the area, which proves especially harmful when the plant’s roots are what keep the marshland solid. The oil and gas industry has also dug an estimated 50,000 wells and laid 10,000 miles of pipeline. It is estimated that the wetlands are shrinking by about one football field each hour. The oil & gas industry takes the partial blame for only 36% of the land lost; researchers estimate that the numbers could actually be over 50% after site assessments.

    The disappearing wetlands have been directly linked to the increase in coastal damages and flooding. The devastation of Hurricane Katrina was a bleakly perfect example. The wetlands serve an extremely important purpose of buffering coastline communities from storm surges and other damages. If nothing is done to slow the loss of land in Louisiana, the state will need to continue to invest billions of dollars in flood protection systems.

    The Board’s lawsuit hopes to hold the gas and oil industry responsible for not only the land loss, but also for financial retribution to fix the problem and protecting communities. Over 100 oil companies are being sued, and they all vow that they will fight the suit. The board also faces many critics in the form of Louisiana politicians, including Governor Bobby Jindal. The Governor feels that the Board has vastly overstepped their authority and have no right to propose the lawsuit. Jindal would like the oil and gas industry to reach a solution with the state in private negotiations, not a potentially ugly court battle.   

     

     

    Keywords:
    water contamination, site assessments.
  • CRG Texas, LLC Kevin C. Casler
    Environmental Specialist
    Job Opportunity posted October 23, 2014 by CRG Texas, LLC Kevin C. CaslerMember in Environmental Jobs Board public
    Job Title:
    Environmental Specialist
    Company Name:
    CRG Texas Environmental Services, Inc.
    Company Address:
    2504 Avenue I
    Rosenberg, Texas 77471
    Google map
    Employment Status:
    Full-time
    Start Date:
    As soon as possible
    Employer Contact:
    Kevin Casler
    Contact Phone:
    713-517-7591
    Contact Email:
    Job Description:

    Job Requirements:
    Bachelor's degree in Ecology, Geology or Environmental Science or a related science, and a minimum of 5-10 years of experience in environmental consulting industry required. Responsibilities include: project management, work plan and cost proposal preparation, client service management, employee management and training, peer review. Must be able to conduct fieldwork for long hours in sometimes severe weather conditions, including walking at least 10 miles in rugged terrain, and be able to carry equipment and supplies weighing greater than 40 pounds. Some travel periodically up to 2 weeks at a time is required when needed. Individual will also be required to make themselves available after normal working hours and weekends when needed. Must be a self starter and lead and manage other team members and subcontractors.

    Benefits: We offer competitive salaries, most major holidays, vacation, sick leave, and medical, dental, and vision insurance benefits. CRG Texas is an equal opportunity employer.

    How to apply: If you wish to be considered for this opportunity, please send a cover letter and a copy of a current resume detailing work experience and education via email to: 

    Organization: CRG Texas Environmental Services, Inc.
    Fax: 713-481-1861
    E-mail: info@crgtexas.com 
    Website: www.crgtexas.com

    Required Experience:

    Practical Experience
    TCEQ PST, LPST, and TRRP experience required; Phase I, II, and II environmental due diligence and remediation.  

    Desired Experience:

    Railroad Commission of Texas experience a plus. NEPA and storm water quality management also a plus. Previous construction and remediation project experience is also preferred.

    Required Skills:

    Applicants must have a good driving and safety record, strong organizational, self discipline, and communication skills; and proficiency with MS Office. 

    Desired Skills:

    AutoCad a plus.

    Local Candidates:
    local preferred
  • readude
    TRPH Reference
    Topic posted October 22, 2014 by readudeSuper Contributor in Discussions > Environmental Due Diligence public
    Title:
    TRPH Reference
    Content:

    Looking for an authoritative source, preferably in California, regarding total recoverable petroleum hydrocarbons (TRPH) concentrations for soil.  I've reviewed a number of Phase II reports that reference 1,000 mg/kg and 500 mg/km as maximum soil concentrations for industrial and residential property use respectively.  Some reference the San Francisco Regional Water Quality Control Board but I come up with nothing on their website.

  • JG
    Can you identify this Sanborn marking?6
    Topic posted October 10, 2014 by JGElite Contributor in Discussions > Environmental Due Diligence public
    Title:
    Can you identify this Sanborn marking?
    Content:

    Any idea what this (circled in red) symbolizes?  My first thought was elevation, but it's a dashed circle and the elevation here is 50 ft.

     

     

    Image:
  • MargaretThibo
    Pining Away for Forest Protection
    Entry posted October 19, 2014 by MargaretThiboContributor in Current Environmental Issues > Current Environmental Issues Blog public
    Title:
    Pining Away for Forest Protection
    Entry:

    The culinary world my soon be without pine nuts if deforestation continues. Unlike most produce, pine nuts are not grown on a farm or orchard, but rather continue to be gathered in a natural forest setting. Pine nuts are essentially the seeds inside of the cones of many species of pine trees. The majority of the world’s pin nut supply comes from China, as well as Russia, Portugal, and the United States. The majority of U.S. pine nuts can be found in Western states like Nevada and New Mexico where they have been harvested on for centuries. As a result the pine nut has deep roots in local culture.

    Over the past twenty years about have of the pine forests have been destroyed. In many cases, pine trees have been clear cut to create more grassland for the cattle industry.  In total, about three million acres were destroyed and converted for agricultural use. Historically, little was done to oppose the destruction as the trees since they were portrayed as an invasive species. Residents were warned that replacing the trees with grassland could prevent wildfires and make the area safer. Later research has revealed that pine nut trees are not invasive, but rather an important part of the local forest’s environmental safety.  The destruction of pine forest in the Western United States has also led to the shrinking of several species of animals, including the pinyon jay. This bird is vital to the spreading of pine nuts so that future trees can be grown.

    Climate change has also changed the environment that the trees grown in, which has resulted in many issues. For instance, the change in climate may be linked to an increase of insect populations. These bugs are consuming more and more of the pine nuts, leaving less for harvesting. Warmer temperatures have also changed the gathering season since the pine cones fall from the trees at different times now.

    Pine nuts are already a relatively expensive culinary delicacy due to their rarity and that they come from the wild and not a farm where that can be grown in mass quantities. The continued destruction of their habitat due to clear cutting forests and climate change promises to endanger their future. The only solution is for the remaining pine nut forests to be protected by environmental regulations.

    Keywords:
    environmental safety, environmental regulationsP
  • readude
    Phase I Quandary2
    Topic posted October 17, 2014 by readudeSuper Contributor in Discussions > Environmental Due Diligence public
    Title:
    Phase I Quandary
    Content:

    I'm finishing up a Phase I for a single parcel that a local governmental agency is acquiring.  A Phase I was previously conducted on the property 10 years ago finding stained soil due to storage of a number of abandoned vehicles.  A very limited Phase II was conducted following the Phase I consisting of very limited soil sampling (2 samples collected using a shovel).  All results were below detection limits for TPH-G, TPH-D, and TPH-MO.  TRPH compounds (total carbon range of C-5 through C-100) were quantified just above the laboratory's RDLs of 50 mg/kg in both soil samples.

    I conducted the site reconnaissance a few days ago.  All the vehicles were removed years ago, no hydrocarbon odors were noted and no visible soil staining observed.  What would your findings be given that so much time has elapsed since the previous investigations, I have reviewed the previous reports from 10 years ago indicating some level of possible contamination, but no overt indications of any impacts during this current Phase I.

    Any help would be much appreciated.  

  • MargaretThibo
    Texas Faces Big Choices in Energy Future
    Entry posted October 18, 2014 by MargaretThiboContributor in Current Environmental Issues > Current Environmental Issues Blog public
    Title:
    Texas Faces Big Choices in Energy Future
    Entry:

    They say that everything is bigger in Texas, and that is unfortunately the case when it comes to carbon pollution created by the state’s power plants. Based on 2012 air quality testing Texas created as much pollution as the entire nation of Egypt. If that isn’t impressive enough, the state’s carbon emissions is the equivalent to about 47 million cars. These comparisons are quite shocking and will help encourage the passage of the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) Clean Power Plan.

    The Clean Power Plan would limit the amount of carbon that can be emitted by a power plant. Currently there are only limitations on heavy metals like mercury and arsenic. The EPA promises that the Plan and its goals are flexible in order for each state to adapt and make the most out of it.

    Ultimately, the Clean Power Plan should reduce the carbon pollution from power plants by as much as 30% which is about the amount that the entire nation of Canada produces. The reduction of carbon pollution will not only help slow down climate change, but it will directly benefit the health of the community. Less carbon pollution in the form of smog and dangerous haze means less breathing problems. According to the EPA’s website: “The Clean Power Plan will lead to climate and health benefits worth an estimated $55 billion to $93 billion in 2030, including avoiding 2,700 to 6,600 premature deaths and 140,000 to 150,000 asthma attacks in children.”

    Texas supporters of the Clean Power Plan, including Governor Rick Perry, believe that this is the opportunity that the state has been waiting for to transition toward sustainable energy.  Becoming leaders in clean energy would set an excellent precedent for other states in the nation. It would also benefit the state of Texas economically. There would be more than the obvious environmental benefits, the state could see over 100,000 new jobs created. Residents would also see their electric bill, water bill, and healthcare costs go down as an indirect result.

    Keywords:
    air quality testing, sustainable energy