This is a public Blog  publicRSS

Entry

    Mark Wallace
    Social Media, Four Years Later…
    Entry posted March 1, 2012 by Mark WallaceElite Contributor, last edited March 2, 2012 
    854 Views, 2 Comments
    Title:
    Social Media, Four Years Later…
    Entry:

    I used to post blogs all the time talking about social media, but it has been a long time since my last post.  When I began blogging on commonground, I was often asked why I was posting about social media in a community for environmental professionals where conversations were about things like phase I assessments, REC's, vapor intrusion, Sanborn maps, etc..   Then, I started to receive calls and meeting requests from many members to talk about the benefits of social media as a business development tool.    We have always remained eager to help members.  Most of those calls and meetings would end with a comment like “that all sounds really great, but how are we going to leverage that in our business” to which I would reply “it doesn't happen overnight, so …..”

    Now, you cannot dispute the fact that social media is part of our lives – like it or not.  Look around your office, your local Dunkin Donuts or Starbucks, or your favorite restaurant and you will see the words Facebook or Twitter  everywhere.  The below excerpt is from a recent Altimeter Group Study on Making the Business Case for Enterprise Social Networks:

    “In 2011, we reached a milestone when over half of all US adults regularly used social networking sites.  That means the majority of American adults are not only familiar with social networking sites like Facebook, LinkedIn and, Twitter, but also understand the value of being connected with the people in their lives”

    Now, fast forward to 2012, it is amazing how much more comfortable the environmental professional community has become with social media.   Some environmental consulting and engineering firms have now integrated social media strategies into their marketing plans, many have lifted bans on using Facebook at their offices, and many are now trying to figure out the best ways to leverage it.   Why, because 11% of all web traffic is on Facebook.   And if people are there, which they clearly are, then businesses must be too.

    This week, I received a handful of emails from Sean Dundon, Dianne Crocker, and a few other members about an upcoming Environmental Business Council Seminar on Social Media 101.  For those of you who are just learning about it, it might be beneficial to attend if you are interested. 

    It got me thinking – would it make sense for us to run a free commonground web seminar on how to generate value for your business through the use social media?  If yes, what are some of the questions you would like to see us cover?

    If we get enough interest and responses to my post, we can pull together a small panel of social media practitioners and experts from our industry to provide you with answers to your questions, case studies, and actionable takeaways to help you grow your business.   

    In closing, I would like to thank you - our members - for your interest, for trying new things, and for thinking we were only partially nuts to build a b2b community where EP’s could collaborate, help each other, and support our industry. 

    Keywords:
    environmental consultant, environmental consulting, commonground, Facebook, LinkedIn, Environmental Business Council, Social Media for Business

    Comment

     

    • Robin Searles

      Great post, Mark.

      I think a seminar on how to generate value via social media would be invaluable. The market is terribly unkind right now for environmental consultants, with increasing TAT- and pricing-related pressures making it a real challenge just to keep the doors open for business.

      With so many in survival mode, I think it is imperative to arm oneself with all available tools, and social media has certainly become an indispensable tool, as the facts bear out. Would-be customers are already living their lives through social media, and it is of paramount importance that consultants ensure their businesses are occupying those same social spaces. 

    • Mark Wallace

      Thanks for the comments Robin.  

      We can certainly address how companies can benefit from having a presence across the major social platforms and how to do so in a way that harnesses the power of social media in the most powerful ways.